The County Line

The County Line

Thursday, October 26, 2017

Sunrise and Sunset on a Milo Crop

A pastel blanket of sky snuggled in over the milo field behind our house. The pink tinges I'd glimpsed while filling my coffee cup lured me outside on a brisk October morning.
The sunrise is a lesson in celebrating the moment:

Miracles come in moments.
Be ready and willing.
Wayne Dyer

The sky shifts subtly, minute by minute, as more sunlight streaks the sky.
And then the sunrise gives way to the day. While photographers talk about the "golden hour" at dusk, the first light of morning also colors the world in a unique brand of light.
Later that same day (Tuesday), Randy began harvesting the milo, also known as grain sorghum. We only had 110 acres to cut, including the field behind our house where I watched the sunrise, and another a mile south.
We planted the crop on May 26. (Click here for a blog post that shows its progress through the summer.)
This harvest only took a couple of afternoons. The field behind the house yielded 62.4 bushels per acre, while the south field was 61 bushels per acre. Another fall task is crossed off the list.

7 comments:

  1. I saw milo for the first time this August, when we took our daughter to college in Hesston KS. (is that far from you?) It's quite beautiful, I think! Glad your harvest is finished. We're in the midst of it here...the corn is coming off as we speak, and the beans will be combined later today. The corn is averaging 250 bushels per acre, which is extremely high this year. Will be interesting to see how the beans do. We've been hearing that they're doing well in this area. We had an usually good growing season this year.

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    1. Hesston is about 1 1/2 hours from here. We are southwest of there.

      Wow! Your corn yields are much better than ours. We were too hot and dry this summer during pollination and grain filling. Today, the silage cutters arrived. So did the winds, so I hope they actually get some silage in the trucks and then into our silo!

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    2. We are very fortunate here...Lancaster County has some of the most productive, non-irrigated soil that can be found. It's certainly not our doing!! Also, the farms here are much, much smaller than in your area (at least I think so!) and we generally use the forages for feeding our cows rather than cash crops, with some exceptions.
      I remember some years where the yields were way, way lower than this, especially when, like you said, the summer is really hot and dry.
      Hopefully your silo will soon be full of good silage!

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  2. Lovely photography as always. Hope the wind dies down.

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    1. Thanks! The north wind blew in some chilly temperatures!

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  3. What great pictures! Don't you feel lucky to live where you are? I am a born and raised city girl, and boy it was a bad fit. I love the country...

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    1. Thank you, Carol! Yes, I am blessed to live and work in a beautiful place.

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